Foreign Aid and the Fight Against Malaria

Sophie Tepler, `14
Sophie Tepler, `14

By: Sophie Tepler, `14

The sun is setting on Sub Saharan Africa.  There is a feeling of calm and stillness as another day comes to a close.  A mosquito buzzes by, then two, then ten and suddenly the air is thick with the sound of buzzing and swooshing mosquitoes, looking for their next blood meal.  The scene is not so peaceful anymore.  There is the imminent danger of a mosquito bite, the looming risk of malaria.  Once every minute, a child living in Africa dies of malaria.

Malaria is a preventable and curable disease that accounts for hundreds of millions of deaths each year, especially in Africa where its burden is especially ponderous.  This paper will explore how foreign aid, in varying level of specificity, can help reduce the number of malaria cases in Sub Saharan Africa.  This was tested by collecting data on malaria infections, foreign aid, GDP and two forms of malaria protection in ten different Sub Saharan African countries for the years 2000 to 2011 and analyzing it to see the effect of these variables on dependent variable, number of malaria cases.  From this research, I found that foreign aid is associated with a decreased number of malaria cases and that health sector aid, foreign aid donated to all health related issues, was more strongly associated with a reduced number of malaria cases than total foreign aid and malaria specific aid, foreign aid donated specifically to combat malaria.
There has been a recent surge in total foreign aid in the past decade as well as an increase in health sector aid, specifically to Africa, which has been argued to be a result of the HIV/AIDS pandemic.  Can this money help reduce the number of malaria cases in Sub Saharan Africa, and if so, what is the most effective method of giving aid?  I hope to show that increased levels of foreign aid, although a broad and sometimes vague concept, is in fact associated with reduced number of malaria cases in Sub Saharan Africa.  It is predicted that malaria specific aid will be the most strongly associated with a reduced number of malaria cases then either total foreign aid or health sector foreign aid because it is specifically targeted at combatting malaria and is therefore more focused than the other two types of aid.

Foreign Aid and the Fight Against Malaria

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